Child labor in the United States in the early 20th century

At the beginning of the 20th century workforce in America had been in short supply and the laws relating to the employment of children, weren’t respected, or simply didn’t exist. In 1908, photographer Lewis Hine went on a journey that documented child labor, which flourished in America, in those days.

Child labor in the United States

Working in a cotton factory, 1909.

Child labor in the United States

Messengers, Western Union. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

Weavers, 1908. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

Working in a factory producing spinners, 1909. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

11-year-old working in a cotton field. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

In a coal mine, 1910. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

Workers at the mill. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

Messenger, Texas, in 1913. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

Miner. Works daily from 7 am to 5 pm. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

Workers on spinning machines. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

Factory for the production of hosiery, 1910. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

Paperboy, 1909. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

Another postal worker. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)

Child labor in the United States

At this age, it’s hard to cope with the spinning machine because there is not enough growth. (Photo by Lewis Hine | Library of Congress)